IMG_0232.jpg

Syd Bruce Joeshort - QLD

'Ghost net' is the term used for damaged fishing nets tat are illegally dumped into the ocean from commercial fishing vessels.  The creative use of ghost nets by indigenous artists has helped raise awareness both nationally and internationally, of the immense environment impact of these nets in the worlds's oceans.  The Gulf of Carpentaria is a 'hotspot', as this region is prime habitat for many species of turtle, shark and fish.  It is also a fertile fishing ground for small and large scale fishing enterprises.  Most ghost nets found on Australian coasts come from Thai Vietnamese, South Korean and Chinese fishing boats operating illegally in the Arafura and Timorese Seas.  The nets travel on NW currents, trapping and killing marine life as the drift.  Eventually, most sink to the ocean floor where they smother reefs and seabeds.  They also pose a considerable boating hazard by entangling propellors.  Nets are found washed up on Pormpuraaw beaches.  Our Land and Sea Rangers and artists bring them to the art centre to be recycled.  Dead fish and debris are tangled in the net and it can take days to cut and clean the net.  

Ghost net art has helped raise awareness both nationally and internationally, of the immense environmental impact of these nets in oceans globally.  The ghost net art genre started in far North Queensland in the communities of Prmpuraaw, Aurukan and Darnley Island. 
-
Pormapuraaw; Stories, Art, Language